Emergency Medicine International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision64 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore0.890
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor1.112

Construction of a Nomogram Model for Predicting Pleural Effusion Secondary to Severe Acute Pancreatitis

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 Journal profile

Emergency Medicine International publishes original research articles and review articles related to prehospital care, disaster preparedness and response, acute medical and paediatric emergencies, critical care and wound care

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Emergency Medicine International maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

The Potential Diagnostic and Predictive Role of HbA1c in Diabetic, Septic Patients: A Retrospective Single-Center Study

Background. As diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor of sepsis, we aimed to evaluate the possible effects of diabetes mellitus and poor glycemic control on the diagnosis of sepsis. Methods. In our retrospective study, we included diabetic, septic patients—in whom the diagnosis of sepsis was based on the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria (n = 112, SIRS group)—who had HbA1c levels measured either in the previous 30 days (n = 39, SIRS 30 d subgroup) or within 24 hours after their emergency department admission (n = 73, SIRS 24 h subgroup). We later selected those patients from the SIRS group, whose sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was ≥2 (n = 55, SOFA group), and these patients were also divided based on the time of HbA1c measurement (n = 21, SOFA 30 d subgroup and n = 34, SOFA 24 h subgroup). We analyzed the relationship between laboratory parameters, length of hospital stay, and HbA1c. Results. We found a significant positive correlation between glucose and HbA1c (, , respectively), significant negative correlations between white blood cell count (WBC) and glucose (, , respectively), WBC and HbA1c levels (, , respectively) in the SIRS 24 h and SOFA 24 h subgroups. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between length of hospital stay and HbA1c in the SOFA 24 h subgroup (). No significant correlations were found in the SIRS 30 d and SOFA 30 d subgroups. Conclusion. Based on our results, normal WBC with elevated HbA1c might be considered a positive SIRS criterium in diabetic, SIRS 24 h patients. Besides this potential diagnostic role, HbA1c might also be an additional prognostic biomarker in diabetic, SOFA 24 h patients.

Research Article

Association between Paramedic Workforce and Survival Rate in Prehospital Advanced Life Support in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients

The low survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients is a global public health challenge. We analyzed the relationship between the number of prehospital EMS personnel and survival admission, survival discharge, and good neurologic outcomes in OHCA patients. This was a retrospective observational study. Adult nontraumatic OHCA patients from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2018, were included from 12 cities in the Gyeonggi province, a metropolitan area located in the suburbs of the capital of the Republic of Korea. By comparing the insufficient EMS team (four or five EMS personnel) and the sufficient EMS team (six EMS personnel), we showed the survival rate of each group. Using propensity score matching, we reduced the bias of the confounding variables. A total of 3,632 OHCA patients were included. After propensity score matching, survival to admission was higher in the sufficient EMS team than in the insufficient EMS team (odds ratio (OR): 1.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04–1.84, ). Survival-to-discharge was similar (OR: 1.70, CI: 1.20–2.40, ), but there was no significant outcome in good neurologic outcomes (OR: 0.88, CI: 0.57–1.36, ). Our findings suggest that a sufficient EMS team (six EMS personnel) could improve the survival admission and discharge of OHCA patients compared to an insufficient EMS team (four or five EMS personnel). However, there was no significant difference in neurologic outcomes according to the number of EMS personnel.

Research Article

Evaluating the Risk of Prescription Opioid Misuse among Adult Emergency Department Patients

Background. Pain is the most commonly treated symptom in the emergency department, and opioids are often prescribed from the emergency department to treat pain. The American College of Emergency Physicians recommends that providers assess the patient's risk of abusing opioids prior to prescribing opioids. In this study, we use a validated risk assessment tool to assess the risk of opioid abuse among emergency medicine patients and the patients’ perceptions of their potential dangers. Methods. This is an observational study conducted in an academic emergency department (ED). All adults presenting to ED were eligible to participate in the study. Individuals were randomly selected to complete a survey which included the Opioid Risk Tool (ORT) and perceptions of sharing controlled substances. Results. There were 300 participants in the study. The 18–45-year age group was the most commonly represented group (58%), and nearly two-thirds (63%) of the population was female. The average opioid risk score was 8 or high risk. Individuals that were at high risk of opioid abuse were less likely to dispose of their additional medications appropriately (19% vs. 12%) and were more likely to share their additional controlled medications with family or friends (18% vs. 3%). Conclusion. The emergency department population is at high risk to abuse opioids. The introduction of safer pain management options should be considered among this high-risk group.

Research Article

Characteristics and Demographics of Patients Requiring Emergent Air Medical

Background. As integrated health systems become more common, interfacility patient transfers will increase and air transport programs will be prioritized. Understanding characteristics of patients triaged to air medical transport will assist with resource allocation and needs assessment. The objective of this study was to investigate the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients that presented to the emergency department (ED) and subsequently required emergent air medical interfacility transport. Methods. This was a retrospective, multicenter study conducted at eight hospitals within Northwell Health, the largest academic health system in New York state. The study was conducted between December 1, 2014, and July 31, 2020, and included patients who presented to an ED and subsequently required emergent air medical interfacility transport. Results. Overall, the median age was 37 years (IQR 4–66), and 231 (54%) subjects were males. The majority of subjects (59%) had no reported comorbidities, arrived by ambulance (52%), and were emergency severity index triage 2 (48%). Frequent indications for transfer were nontraumatic neurologic (37%), pulmonary or respiratory (13%), trauma (12%), and cardiovascular (12%). Most patients were not ventilated before transport (71%). The median time to call for transport at the sending institution was 2:42 hours (IQR 1:14–6:54), and the median length of stay was 4:12 (IQR 2:31–8:48). Most patients were subsequently admitted (96%) at the receiving institution to an intensive care unit (72%). Conclusions. This study describes patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics who required emergent air medical transport. Helicopter transport is costly, and data from these patients may further help our understanding of who is transported by air and how important air transport is to the health system.

Research Article

Characteristics of Acute Appendicitis before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Single Center Experience

The aim of the study was to investigate whether the COVID-19 pandemic caused an increased incidence of complicated appendicitis due to the late presentation when compared to the pre-COVID-19 period. Summary Background Data. Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical emergencies. During the coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, there has been a reported delay in the presentation of some urgencies to the emergency hospital departments. Methods. A total of 427 patients who underwent surgical treatment due to suspected acute appendicitis from June 2019 to November 2020 were retrospectively included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups: the first (pre-COVID-19) group consisted of patients who had surgery before the onset of COVID-19 pandemic (n = 240), while the second (COVID-19) group consisted of those who were operated during the COVID-19 pandemic (n = 187). The primary outcome of the study was to compare the incidence of perforated appendicitis before and during the onset of COVID-19. Results. Overall, 84 patients (19.67%) were diagnosed with perforated appendicitis. We found a weak significance () in the rate of perforated appendicitis between the pre-COVID-19 (17.08%) and the COVID-19 era (22.99%). Conclusions. We did not observe any significant difference in the complications of acute appendicitis before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in a university hospital in Rijeka. An emergent medical care should always be accessible.

Research Article

Improving the Prehospital Identification and Acute Care of Acute Stroke Patients: A Quality Improvement Project

Background. There are a large number of stroke patients in China, and there is currently a lack of prehospital acute stroke care training programs. Aim. To develop a prehospital emergency medical service (PEMS) training program to improve the prehospital identification and acute care of acute stroke. Methods. Forty prehospital emergency doctors whose service stations are located within a 10 km radius from Shanghai Pudong New Area Medical Emergency Service Center took this course on November 13, 2014. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the PEMS personnel’s knowledge in stroke and acute stroke care and was conducted before and after training as an assessment of the effectiveness of training. The patient population in this study included a baseline cohort before training and a prospective cohort after training, each composed of patients who were sent to Shanghai East Hospital South Stoke Center within one year. The transit time, final diagnosis, administration of thrombolysis, and door-to-needle time (DNT) were collected and analyzed. Results. After the training, 100% of the PEMS personnel were competent to identify stroke cases using the Cincinnati prehospital stroke scale (CPSS). All participants realized that intravenous thrombolysis therapy in a time-sensitive manner is the most effective way to treat acute ischemic stroke. Although there was no difference in first-aid transit time before and after training, the stroke diagnosis rate improved by 6.5% after training . The thrombolysis rate increased to 29.6% from 24.3% but did not reach statistical significance. Compared to 84.0 minutes (standard deviation: 23.1 minutes) before the training, the average DNT after training was 53 minutes (standard deviation: 15.0 minutes), demonstrating a remarkable reduction . Conclusion. The training program effectively improved the PEMS personnel’s knowledge in stroke and stroke acute care.

Emergency Medicine International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision64 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore0.890
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor1.112
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.