International Journal of Breast Cancer
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Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision45 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore3.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.350
Impact Factor-

Association of XRCC3, XRCC4, BAX, and BCL-2 Polymorphisms with the Risk of Breast Cancer

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International Journal of Breast Cancer provides a forum for scientists, clinicians, and health care professionals working in breast cancer research and management. Research includes molecular pathology, genomics, genetic predisposition etc.

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International Journal of Breast Cancer maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Assessment of Suspected Breast Lesions in Early-Stage Triple-Negative Breast Cancer during Follow-Up after Breast-Conserving Surgery Using Multiparametric MRI

Background. The local recurrence rate of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) can be as high as 12%.The standard treatment for early-stage TNBC is breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by postoperative radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. However, detection of the local recurrence of the disease after radiotherapy is a major issue. Objective. The aim of this study was at investigating the role of dynamic and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during follow-up after BCS and radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy to differentiate between locoregional recurrence and postoperative fibrosis. Patients and Methods. This prospective study was conducted at the oncology, radiology, and pathology departments, Tanta University. It involved 50 patients with early-stage TNBC who were treated with BCS, followed by radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy. The suspected lesions were evaluated during the follow-up period by sonomammography. All patients were subjected to MRI, including conventional sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic postcontrast study. Results. Ten cases were confirmed as recurrent malignant lesions. After contrast administration, they all exhibited irregular T1 hypodense lesions of variable morphology with diffusion restriction and positive enhancement. Eight cases displayed a type III curve, while two showed a type II curve. Histopathological assessment was consistent with the MRI findings in all eight cases. The combination of the data produced by DWI-MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI resulted in 100%sensitivity, 92.5% specificity, 90.9% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 98% accuracy. Conclusion. Combination of DWI-MRI and DCE-MRI could have high diagnostic value for evaluating postoperative changes in patients with TNBC after BCS, followed by radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy. Trial Registrations. No trial to be registered.

Review Article

Pharmacological Properties to Pharmacological Insight of Sesamin in Breast Cancer Treatment: A Literature-Based Review Study

The use of dietary phytochemical rather than conventional therapies to treat numerous cancers is now a well-known approach in medical science. Easily available and less toxic dietary phytochemicals present in plants should be introduced in the list of phytochemical-based treatment areas. Sesamin, a natural phytochemical, may be a promising chemopreventive agent aiming to manage breast cancer. In this study, we discussed the pharmacological properties of sesamin that determine its therapeutics opportunity to be used in breast cancer treatment and other diseases. Sesamin is available in medicinal plants, especially in Sesamum indicum, and is easily metabolized by the liver. To better understand the antibreast cancer consequence of sesamin, we postulate some putative pathways related to the antibreast cancer mechanism: (1) regulation of estrogen receptor (ER-α and ER-β) activities, (2) suppressing programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) overexpression, (3) growth factor receptor inhibition, and (4) some tyrosine kinase pathways. Targeting these pathways, sesamin can modulate cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell growth and viability, metastasis, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and oncogene inactivation in various in vitro and animal models. Although the actual tumor intrinsic signaling mechanism targeted by sesamin in cancer treatment is still unknown, this review summarized that this phytoestrogen suppressed NF-κB, STAT, MAPK, and PIK/AKT signaling pathways and activated some tumor suppressor protein in numerous breast cancer models. Cotreatment with γ-tocotrienol, conventional drugs, and several drug carriers systems increased the anticancer potentiality of sesamin. Furthermore, sesamin exhibited promising pharmacokinetics properties with less toxicity in the bodies. Overall, the shreds of evidence highlight that sesamin can be a potent candidate to design drugs against breast cancer. So, like other phytochemicals, sesamin can be consumed for better therapeutic advantages due to having the ability to target a plethora of molecular pathways until clinically trialed standard drugs are not available in pharma markets.

Research Article

Clinical Significance of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Ki67 Expression as a Predictive Value for Pathological Complete Response following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Experience from a Tertiary Care Center in Lebanon

Introduction. Breast cancer is considered nowadays the most prevalent cancer worldwide. The molecular era has successfully divided breast cancer into subtypes based on the various hormonal receptors. These molecular subtypes play a major role in determining the neoadjuvant chemotherapy to be administered. It was noted that the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with higher achievement of pathological complete response. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive role of breast cancer subtypes in the efficacy and prognosis of neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Methods. Combining dose dense anthracycline-based, regular dose anthracycline-based, and nonanthracycline-based chemotherapy, we observed data from 87 patients with breast cancer who received surgery after administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy at our institution between January 2015 and July 2018. The patients were classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2 overexpression, and triple negative breast cancer as well as low Ki67 (≤14%) and high Ki67 (>14%) expression groups using immunohistochemistry. Pathologic complete response was the only neoadjuvant chemotherapy outcome parameter. To evaluate variables associated with pathologic complete response, we used univariate analyses followed by multivariate logistic regression. Results. 87 patients with breast cancer were classified into different subtypes according to the 12th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference. The response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was significantly different () between the subgroups. There were significant correlations between pathological complete response (pCR) and ER status (), HER2 (), molecular subtypes (), T stage (), N stage before chemotherapy (), and type of chemotherapy (). Luminal B type patients had the lowest pCR, followed by luminal A type patients. Conclusion. Evaluating molecular subtype’s significance in breast cancer prognosis warrants additional studies in our region with extensive data about patient-specific neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens. Our study was able to reproduce results complementary to those present in the literature in other outcomes.

Research Article

Prognostic Implications of MALAT1 and BACH1 Expression and Their Correlation with CTCs and Mo-MDSCs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Surgical Management Options

Background. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a biologically separate entity of breast cancer that cannot get benefits from targeted or endocrine therapy. Objective. To assess the expression of MALAT1 and BACH1, as well as monocyte-myeloid-derived suppressor cell (Mo-MDSC) levels and circulating tumor cell (CTC) count in TNBC to correlate these markers with the clinic-pathological criteria of TNCB patients and to evaluate their roles as predictive markers for selection of the patients that can be operated by oncoplastic conserving breast surgery. Methods. Eighty-eight TNBC were managed by modified doughnut breast oncoplastic surgery in early stages and by modified radical mastectomy for patients with late stages unsuitable for breast-conserving. All were examined for MALAT1 and BACH1 expression by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR as well as Mo-MDSC levels and CTCs. Results. MALAT1 and BACH1 expressions are correlated with the larger size, lymph node, distance metastasis, and TNM staging (). and high MO-MDSCs were significantly more in TNBC with MALAT1 and BACH1 overexpression. The survival study proved that DFS for patients with both positive expression of MALAT1 and BACH1 was shorter than that of one positive expression, and both negative expression , , and high Mo-MDSCs are associated with poor outcomes. No significant difference between modified round block and modified radical mastectomy techniques as regards recurrence. However, all postoperative management outcomes were significantly better in patients operated by oncoplastic conserving breast surgery. Conclusion. BACH1 and MALAT1 expressions are significantly upregulated in TNBC. They are correlated with CTCs and Mo-MDCs, and all are associated with poor outcomes. Not all TNBC patients have a bad prognosis, patients negative for one of MALAT1 and BACH1 or both, have a slightly good prognosis, and so can be managed by breast oncoplastic conserving surgery.

Research Article

Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) toward Cervical Cancer Screening among Adama Science and Technology University Female Students, Ethiopia

Background. Cervical cancer is a complication of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Eighty percent of the cases occur in low-resource countries. According to the 2009 World Health Organization report, the age-adjusted incidence rate of cervical cancer in Ethiopia was 35.9 per 100,000 patients with 7619 annual number of new cases and 60-81 deaths every year. The study is aimed at assessing the level of knowledge, attitude, and practice concerning cervical cancer among female students at Adama Science and Technology University. Methodology. An institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted among 667Adama Science and Technology University female students. A simple random sampling method was used to select the respondents. Structured self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Results. About 404 (60.6%) of the participants heard about cervical cancer, 478 (71.7%) had positive attitude towards cervical cancer screening, and only 15 (2.2%) participants were screened for cervical cancer. Lack of information about cervical cancer was the most reported reason for not attending to cervical cancer screening. Conclusion and Recommendation. The study showed that there was low knowledge on cervical cancer and screening for premalignant lesion among women. There is a need to promote and encourage women to early cervical cancer screening at precancerous stage by informing their susceptibility to cervical cancer.

Research Article

Indeterminate (B3) Breast Lesions and the Ongoing Role of Diagnostic Open Biopsy

Introduction. Due to their uncertain malignant potential, indeterminate breast lesions on core needle biopsy (CNB) require diagnostic open biopsy (DOB). This study evaluated DOB results given largely benign pathology. Lesions included are atypical papilloma, atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), and radial scar/complex sclerosing lesions (RS/CSL). Methodology. A retrospective audit from 2010 to 2017 analysed patients with a screen-detected suspicious lesion and indeterminate (B3) CNB diagnosis. Primary outcome was the malignancy upgrade rate, with secondary evaluation of patient factors predictive of malignancy including age, symptoms, mammogram characteristics, lesion size, biopsy method, and past and family history. Results. 152 patients (median age 57 years) were included, with atypical papillomas being the largest subgroup (44.7%). On DOB histology, 99.34% were benign, resulting in a 0.66% malignancy upgrade rate. Patient characteristic analysis identified 86.84% of B3 lesions were in patients greater than 50 years old. 90.13% were asymptomatic, whilst 98.68% and 72.37% had a negative past and family history. Majority 46.71% of lesions had the mammogram characteristic of being a mass. However, with 57.89% of the lesion imaging size less than 4 mm, a corresponding 60.5% of core needle biopsies were performed stereotactically. The small malignant subgroup limited predictive factor evaluation. Conclusion. Albeit a low 0.66% malignancy upgrade rate in B3 lesions, no statistically significant patient predictive factors were identified. Until predictive factors and further assessment of vacuum-assisted excision (VAE) techniques evolve, DOB remains the standard of care.

International Journal of Breast Cancer
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision45 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore3.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.350
Impact Factor-
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