International Journal of Dentistry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore2.800
Journal Citation Indicator0.730
Impact Factor-

Article of the Year 2020

COVID-19: Changing Trends and Its Impact on Future of Dentistry

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Dentistry publishes original research articles and review articles in all areas of dentistry, including periodontal diseases, dental implants, oral pathology, as well as oral and maxillofacial surgery.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Dr Patricia Pereira, is based at the University of Florida, USA. Her main research interests are cosmetic and esthetic dentistry, involving direct and indirect bonded restorations.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Accuracy of Estimating Periodontitis and Its Risk Association Using Partial-Mouth Recordings for Surveillance Studies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Objectives. Our aim is to conduct an up-to-date systematic review and meta-analysis pertaining to the accuracy of using the partial-mouth recording protocol (PRP) in surveillance studies to estimate the periodontitis prevalence, extent, severity, and its risk associations. Methods. Medline and Embase databases were searched for studies which assessed the periodontitis prevalence, severity, extent, or its risk associations using PRPs versus full-mouth recording protocols (FRPs); searches were conducted up until May 26, 2021. The risk of bias and the applicability of the studies were assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Both qualitative data synthesis and quantitative data synthesis were performed, and comparisons were done for the accuracy and precision of PRPs for different periodontitis outcomes. The study’s protocol was registered through the International Platform of Registered Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols (registration number: INPLASY202160032). Results. A total of 14 studies were included. The studies had a considerable degree of heterogeneity, along with a moderate risk of bias and applicability concerns. Several factors influenced the accuracy or precision of using PRPs, including the age, distribution of periodontitis in the studied population, PRP selection, total PRP sites, the threshold for minimum sites with CAL, and the severity of periodontitis case definitions. Overall, the PRP with the highest accuracy and precision mainly included (1) a full-mouth protocol at the following partial sites: mesiobuccal-midbuccal-distolingual (MB-B-DL), mesiobuccal-distolingual (MB-DL), mesiobuccal-midbuccal-distobuccal (MB-B-DB), mesiobuccal-distobuccal (MB-DB), and 84 sites using the random site selection method (RSSM) and (2) random-half-mouth (RHM) protocols. Conclusions. The PRPs with the highest overall accuracy and precision in estimating the periodontitis prevalence, extent, severity, and risk associations included the full-mouth assessment at the following partial sites: MB-B-DL, MB-DL, MB-B-DB, MB-DB, and 84 sites using RSSM and RHM protocols.

Research Article

Effect of Preirradiation Fluoride Treatment on the Physical Properties of Dentin

Objective. To determine the effects of preirradiation fluoride treatments on the Knoop hardness of dentin. Materials and Methods. Human posterior teeth mounted into acrylic resin molds were polished with silicon carbide (SiC) abrasives and 3-micron diamond paste. The Knoop hardness of dentin was measured with a Leco hardness instrument. The teeth were divided into groups of ten teeth per group as follows: no treatment (control), treatment with silver diamine fluoride (SDF), MI varnish (MI), and cavity shield (CS). The teeth were exposed to 2 Gy of daily radiation for six weeks using an X-Rad 320ix biological irradiator. Hardness was measured weekly, before, during, and after irradiation. The teeth were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC between radiation treatments. Results. In preirradiation dentin, a Knoop hardness value of 58.8 (14.1) KHN was obtained. Treatment with SDF significantly increased KHN before irradiation. Immediately after radiation treatment, hardness was significantly reduced in all experimental groups. Postirradiation fluoride treatments increased the hardness of dentin to varying degrees. Conclusions. Preirradiation fluoride treatment does not provide protection from decreases in the hardness of dentin. Treatment of teeth with fluoride formulations after radiation progressively restores the hardness of dentin to different degrees.

Research Article

Mother’s Characteristics and Socioeconomic Status as Possible Risk Factors for Children’s Caries in Jordan

Background. Clinical oral health status of children affects their health-related quality of life. A major determinant of oral health is early childhood caries, which possesses a negative effect. Objective. The primary objective of the study was to examine the association between socioeconomic status and different mother’s characteristics and the risk of dental caries in children using the decay missing filled (DMF) score as an indicator. Methods. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study that was in the pediatric dental clinic in Hashem Ibn Al-Hussein medical military hospital in Jordan. Pearson correlation was used to examine associations between two continuous variables. Linear regression was used to detect variables that might predict the decayed missing filled teeth (dmft) score of the child. Results. A total of 264 children were enrolled in the study. Average age of children was 4.80 ± 1.99 years, and average mothers’ age was 32.74 ± 5.68. Mothers had an average DMFT score of 8.84 ± 5.39, while children had an average dmft score of 6.17 ± 4.82. There was no association between the mother’s age and the dmft score of the child (Pearson correlation = 0.08, and value = 0.215). However, a moderate, statistically significant correlation was found between the mother’s and the child’s DMFT scores (Pearson correlation = 0.418, and value = 0.001). Children who belonged to low and middle-income families had a higher dmft score compared to those that belonged to families with high income. Conclusion. Socioeconomic status of the family, mother’s habits, dental hygiene, and education level are important factors that influence the child’s oral health. Strategies that focus on children with these characteristics can help them achieve better oral health.

Research Article

Quantitative Fit Test of a 3D Printed Frame Fitted Over a Surgical Mask: An Alternative Option to N95 Respirator

Background. COVID-19 has spread worldwide and caused severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) led to numerous dead cases. However, with the new COVID-19 outbreaks, there is a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) especially N95 masks worldwide including Thailand. This issue had placed the health professional in great need of an alternative mask. Aim. This study aimed to measure the fit factor of 3D printed frames by quantitative fit testing (QNFT) to find an alternative facemask by using a mask fitter together with 2 different kinds of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) level 1 surgical mask. Materials and Methods. Two commonly used surgical masks (Sultan Com-Fit Super Sensitive Ear Loop Mask or “White Mask Group,” not water-resistant, and Sultan Blue Com-Fit Super High Filtration Ear Loop Mask or “Blue Mask Group,” water-resistant) with and without 3D printed frame covering. The fit performance was measured by a quantitative fit test (QNFT) device (PortaCount, model 8048, TSI Incorporated, Minnesota, USA) accepted by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The PortaCount device, which is based on a miniature continuous flow condensation nucleus counter (CNC), assesses the respiratory fit by comparing the concentration of ambient dust particles outside the surgical mask to the concentration that has leaked into the surgical mask. The ratio of these two concentrations (Cout/Cin) is called the fit factor. A fit factor of a 3D printed frame of at least 100 is required and considered as a pass level. Results. We found that the mask fitter improves the overall performance of surgical masks significantly. The improved performance is comparable to that of N95. Conclusion. The mask fitter improves the performance of surgical masks. The authors suggested that further study on frame material, shape, and expanded sample size would be beneficial to society.

Review Article

Evaluation of Electromyographic Activity of Masticatory Muscles in Adults with Posterior Crossbite

Introduction. There is evidence that patients with posterior crossbite (PXB) have neuromuscular changes in the masticatory muscles. However, up to the present time, the relationship among these changes on the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles is still unclear. Objective. To systematic review the available literature on the electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles in adults with PXB. Methods. Between August 22 and September 9, 2020, we searched the following seven electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, SciELO, LILACS, and Scopus. No restrictions were applied regarding the language and year of publication. This systematic review was registered in the Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO - CRD42020205057) database and conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. After data selection and extraction, the methodological quality of the selected studies was conducted independently by two reviewers, using two different evaluation tools. Results. 6957 records were initially located after the search process. In the end, eight papers were selected. Most studies were classified as having average to low methodological quality and moderate to high risk of bias. Based on the available evidence, adult patients with PXB have electromyographic activity changes in the masticatory muscles when compared with individuals without PXB. Moreover, adult patients with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB) have asymmetrical electromyographic activity when the crossbite side is compared with the noncrossbite side. Conclusion. Despite the lack of studies with high methodological quality, electromyographic evaluation of masticatory muscles should be considered in the diagnosis and in the orthodontic treatment plan of patients with PXB. Prospective studies with a higher sample size and follow-up time, conducted using a rigorous scientific methodology, are necessary to reach a more reliable conclusion.

Research Article

Stress Distribution Pattern in Mini Dental Implant-Assisted RPD with Different Clasp Designs: 3D Finite Element Analysis

Introduction. The removable partial denture (RPD) components, especially the retentive arm, play a major role in the loading characteristic on supporting structures. Objective. To evaluate and compare the effect of different clasp designs on the stress distribution pattern, maximum von Mises stress, and average hydrostatic pressure on abutment teeth, as well as edentulous ridges, mini dental implants (MDIs), and peri-implant bone between the conventional removable partial denture (CRPD) and mini dental implant-assisted distal extension removable partial denture (IARPD) using a three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA). Materials and Methods. 3D FEA models of mandibular arches, with and without bilateral MDI at the second molar areas, and Kennedy class I RPD frameworks, with RPA, RPI, Akers, and no clasp component, were generated. A total of 200 N vertical load was bilaterally applied on both sides of distal extension areas, and the stress was analyzed by 3D FEA. Results. The stress concentration of IARPD with RPI clasp design was located more lingually on abutment teeth, MDI, and peri-implant bone, while the other designs were observed distally on the supporting structures. The maximum von Mises stress on the abutment root surface was decreased when the RPDs were assisted with MDIs. The CRPD and IARPD with the Akers clasp design showed the highest von Mises stress followed by the designs with RPA and RPI clasp, respectively. The average hydrostatic pressure in each group was in approximation. Conclusion. The placement of MDIs on distal extension ridges helps to reduce the stress concentration on denture supporting structures. The maximum von Mises stress is affected by the different designs of clasp components. The CRPD and the IARPD with RPI clasp provide the least stress on supporting structures.

International Journal of Dentistry
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate22%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication36 days
CiteScore2.800
Journal Citation Indicator0.730
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.