International Journal of Food Science
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication52 days
CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-

Indexing news

International Journal of Food Science has been accepted into:
Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science), and
Food Science and Technology Abstracts

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Food Science publishes research in all areas of food science. It is a multidisciplinary journal and includes research on enhancing shelf life, food deterioration, food engineering, food handling, food processing and similar.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Giorgia Spigno, is a Professor of Food Science and Technology at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. Her research focuses on the valorisation of agro-food waste, food product development, and food packaging.

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Research Article

Nutritional Evaluation of Buns Developed from Chickpea-Mung Bean Composite Flour and Sugar Beet Powder

The research was aimed at developing recipes for buns studying the nutritional value of securities. In the work, an assortment of bakery products was developed from flour, composite mixtures of leguminous crops and dry powders of sugar beets. As a result, bakery products with useful properties and improved qualities were obtained. In the recipe, sugar was completely replaced by dry powders of sugar beet. The optimal combination for making a bun from composite flour and dry sugar beet powder was 10% chickpea and 5% mung bean flour with 9.23 g of dry sugar beet powder added per 100 g flour. Physical and chemical indicators, including mineral elements, vitamin composition, and safety indicators, were determined. It was proven that the use of composite flour from leguminous crops contributes to a contraction of the technological process of the production of bakery products, reducing the time needed for dough preparation and baking. The use of technology for obtaining bakery products and recipes in production allows expanding the range of bakery products, reducing the duration of the technological process of production, improving the quality of finished products, and increasing labour productivity. It also helps to improve the socioeconomic indicators of bakery and confectionery enterprises.

Research Article

Effect of Boiling on the Nutrient Composition of Solanum Torvum

The fruits and leaves of Solanum torvum are good sources of nutrients and minerals for the prevention of nutrient deficiencies. However, there is limited information on the effect of boiling on the nutrients, minerals and phytochemicals in the fruits and leaves. This study sought to assess the mineral, macronutrient and phytochemical compositions of fresh and boiled fruits and leaves of S. torvum. Fresh unripe fruit and leaf samples of S. torvum were collected from six communities, boiled, and pulverized for mineral, proximate and phytochemical analyses. The data obtained was subjected to ANOVA and t-test. Solanum torvum was found to contain Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Ca, Mg, Na, K, protein, crude fat, carbohydrate, fibre, saponins, tannins, flavanols, terpenoids/steroids and glycosides making it nutritious. The results revealed almost equal concentrations of minerals in fresh and boiled leaves and fruits. A similar observation was made in the case of carbohydrate, crude fat and ash. However, there were significant differences in moisture, protein and crude fibre concentrations in the samples. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of saponin, tannin, flavonoids, terpenoids/steroids and glycosides in all leaf samples no matter the treatment. There were no flavonoids and terpenoids/steroids in fruits. Boiling nominally reduced and in a few cases, increased concentration of the nutrient composition but did not have significant effect on the concentration of the macro- and micro- minerals in the fruits and leaves. This study suggests that boiling could affects the concentration of nutrients that could be accessed in fruits and leaves of S. torvum.

Research Article

Evaluation of Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) Production Using Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) Biomass Supplemented with Agricultural Wastes

The cost of substrates has been one of the challenges for mushroom cultivation. The commonly used substrates for mushroom production are usually expensive. Substrates with a high biomass return that can pose environmental problems can be good alternatives for mushroom cultivation due to multiple advantages. In this regard, the potential use of water hyacinth biomass (a troublesome aquatic weed) as an alternative substrate is worthy of being studied. This study was aimed at evaluating the potential use of water hyacinth biomass for the production of oyster mushroom. The experiment was done in a completely randomized design with nine treatments and four replications. Water hyacinth biomass was supplemented with straw (wheat, Triticum aestivum, and teff or Eragrostis Teff) at a ratio of 1 : 1, 1 : 3, or 3 : 1. The developmental parameters including days elapsed for mycelium invasion (MI), pinhead formation (PF), and the first flush (FH) were monitored. Growth parameters (cap diameter (CD) and stalk length (SL)), a yield parameter (total weight of mushroom yield), and biological efficiency (BF %) were also recorded. Finally, the economic return (ER) of all the treatments was calculated. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the significance of variation between the different parameters on the production parameters. Means were separated using the Tukey test, when F-test from ANOVA was significant at . It was observed that water hyacinth biomass alone or supplemented with wheat or teff straw provided promising performance on oyster mushroom development, growth, yield, and biological efficiency compared to the costly substrates (wheat and teff straw). Thus, water hyacinth can be considered as a low-cost substrate for mushroom cultivation and a means to control this aquatic weed from rapid spreading.

Research Article

Production of Chicken Patties Supplemented with Cantaloupe By-Products: Impact on the Quality, Storage Stability, and Antioxidant Activity

This study investigated the effect of supplementation with cantaloupe peel (CP) and seeds (CS) (3, 6, 9, and 12%) powder on the quality and antioxidant activity of raw and cooked chicken patties during storage (-20°C/3 months). The addition of CP and CS powder increased protein, fat, ash, and fiber values of chicken patties compared with control, while carbohydrate, pH, and TBA were decreased at zero time and after 3 months of storage. The WHC, cooking yield, fat retention, and moisture retention were increased by increasing CP and CS powder addition ratios, while cooking loss and shrinkage were decreased. Also, CP and CS powder improved antioxidant activity, microbiological quality, and overall acceptability of chicken patties. The hardness of raw and cooked chicken patties was decreased with increasing CP and CS addition ratios. It is recommended to use CP and CS powder as functional ingredients in the preparation of functional foods.

Research Article

Characterization of the Biochemical Potential of Moroccan Onions (Allium cepa L.)

Allium cepa L. remains the most cultivated Allium species in Morocco and around the world. With the purpose of making the first biochemical characterization of Moroccan onions, several biochemical components have been measured in eleven onion ecotypes. Onions were collected as seeds from different geographical origins and cultivated in the same environment, to eliminate the influence of the environment on biochemical expression. Moisture, total phenols, flavonoids, antioxidant activity, total and reducing sugars, and sulfur dioxide were the biochemical properties of interest. Except for moisture, the eleven onion ecotypes revealed a highly significant variation in terms of the studied biochemical characters. The total phenol and flavonoid content ranged from 5.94 to 11.22 mg equivalent gallic acid/g dry weight and 0.67 to 1.52 mg equivalent quercetin/g dry weight, respectively. The antioxidant activity of the studied onions showed a strong correlation with the polyphenols (), especially with the flavonoids (). The sulfur dioxide content parted from 85.60 to 30.43 ppm when measured using the Monier-Williams distillation method. The current results show that there is no correlation between total sugars and reducing sugars. In conclusion, these findings present a clear biochemical profile of Moroccan onion ecotypes, as well as confirm, for the first time, the presence of a clear variation between the biochemical profiles of Moroccan onion ecotypes, which could be useful for future valorization programs.

Review Article

Camels, Camel Milk, and Camel Milk Product Situation in Kenya in Relation to the World

Kenya is the leading camel milk producer globally, with an annual production volume of 1.165 MMT, followed by Somalia (0.958 MMT) and Mali (0.271 MMT). In Kenya, pastoral tribes in North-Eastern parts rear about 4.722 million camels accounting for about 80% of all camels. Camels offer locals various benefits, including transportation of goods across the deserts, meat, fur, and milk. Camel milk contains natural therapeutically and immunity-boosting properties due to the higher concentration of lactoferrin, lactoglobulins, and lysozyme than bovine milk. Camel milk has been shown to have hypoallergenicity properties compared to bovine milk. Camel and human milk are similar in nutritional composition and therapeutic properties. Camel milk is known to fight various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, autism, hypertension, and skin diseases. Despite the standing of Kenya in the world in terms of camel milk production, Kenya lags considering the camel milk products, industries, and marketing. This paper reviews recent literature on camels and camel milk production trends in Kenya in relation to the world. The review also discusses various camel milk properties (nutritional and therapeutic) as well as the camel milk sector situation in Kenya.

International Journal of Food Science
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication52 days
CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.