Journal of Skin Cancer
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate29%
Submission to final decision34 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor-

Clinicopathological Analysis and Surgical Outcome of Eyelid Malignancies: A Study of 332 Cases

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 Journal profile

Journal of Skin Cancer publishes clinical and translational research on the detection, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of skin malignancies.

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Journal of Skin Cancer maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice toward Skin Cancer Prevention and Detection among Jordanian Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

Introduction. Skin cancer is one of the most growing types of cancer, especially in the Mediterranean, even though it is a preventable disease. The purpose of this study is to assess medical students’ knowledge, attitude, and practice about skin cancer prevention and detection. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated structured questionnaire covering the areas of knowledge, attitude, and practice of the study participants. Results. The study involved 1530 students; 55.3% were females. Most of the students possessed proper knowledge about skin cancer (81%). The most prevalent skin cancer risk factors were sun exposure during the day (83.5%) and immunosuppression (71.2%). More than half of the students did not have any habits of skin examination (61.5%). 20% of the students never used sunscreen, while only 20% of them avoided sun exposure during day hours. Conclusion. The general level of the medical students’ knowledge of skin cancer and its risk factors appeared to be higher than what is found in other studies; it is reasonable as the study participants were medical students. However, the protective behavior from the sun was inadequate when compared to the level of knowledge reported. Additional education about the behavior toward sun exposure and protection against skin cancer may be needed to be implemented in the dermatology curriculum.

Research Article

UV-Induced Skin Cancer Knowledge, Sun Exposure, and Tanning Behavior among University Students: Investigation of an Opportunity Sample of German University Students

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the most important risk factor for developing skin cancer. University students can be considered as a particularly high-risk group for long- and short-term adverse effects of UVR due to intensive solar UVR exposure and high rates of sunburn. While validated questionnaires for assessing solar UVR exposure and sun protection behavior are available in German, a questionnaire for assessing the level of knowledge about this topic is still missing. We conducted a literature search for cross-sectional studies assessing skin cancer and sun protection knowledge among university students in Medline (via PubMed) and analyzed existing questionnaires and topics contained therein. We chose to translate the “Skin Cancer and Sun Knowledge Scale” referring to the TRAPD method into the German language and pilot-tested the translation with an opportunity sample of German students. The literature search revealed 36 eligible studies. Four major topics were identified within the studies: knowledge on skin cancer, risk factors, UVR, and sun protection measures. One hundred and seven German university students (86.0% female) with a mean age of 26.25 years (SD ± 4.58; range: 19–46) participated in our pilot study. The internal reliability of the scale was KR-20 = 0.624. We discovered an improvable level of knowledge in terms of skin cancer among the study population. Statistical analyses revealed no significant associations between the level of knowledge and UVR exposure or tanning behavior, respectively. The skin cancer and sun protection knowledge of German university students should be examined thoroughly. While the psychometric properties of the SCSK require further thorough investigation, first empirical experiences indicate the suitability of the tool to assess the level of knowledge regarding skin cancer and sun protection.

Research Article

Factors Associated with Skin Cancers in People with Albinism in Togo

Objective. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with skin cancers in people with albinism (PWA) in Togo. Method. This is a retrospective analytical study of the records of PWA examined during five dermatological consultation campaigns from 2019 to 2021. Results. During the study period, 517 PWA were seen. Sixty-four (12.3%) of these PWA had presented with 137 cases of skin cancer. The sex ratio (M/F) was 0.9. The average age of PWA with skin cancer was 39.69 ± 15.61 years and that of PWA without skin cancer was 19.17 ± 15.24 years (). The 137 cases of skin cancers were dominated by basal cell carcinomas (45.9%). These skin cancers were located preferentially in the cephalic region (77 cases; 56.2%), followed by the upper limbs (33 cases; 24.1%). In multivariate analysis, the risk factors for skin cancers in PWA were age over 39 years () and the presence of actinic keratoses (). In contrast, the presence of ephelides () was a protective factor. Conclusion. This study confirms that advanced age and actinic keratoses are risk factors for skin cancer in PWA, in connection with the cumulative role of solar radiation. Its originality lies in the identification of ephelides as a protective factor. The knowledge and consideration of these risk factors will make it possible to optimise strategies for the prevention of skin cancers in PWA.

Research Article

Use of Intraoperative Frozen Section in the Surgical Management of Patients with Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

Background. Intraoperative frozen section (IFS) is often utilised in the surgical treatment of nonmelanocytic skin cancer (NMSC) in sensitive facial regions when Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is not available. Objective. To compare the outcome of NMSC patients with excision performed with and without IFS. Materials and Methods. A retrospective, single-centre study was performed on all patients who had undergone resection of NMSC with and without IFS control at the National University Hospital (NUH) from 2010 to 2015. Results. 116 patients were recruited, of which 86 had IFS and 30 did not. The complete excision rate of patients with IFS was higher at 87.2% (), need for secondary operation was lower at 1.2% (), and need for postsurgery radiotherapy or chemotherapy was lower at 1.2% (). The average duration of surgery in patients who underwent IFS was 95.4 minutes compared to 70.1 minutes in cases which did not undergo IFS. Conclusion. Our study showed an increased complete excision rate and reduced need for secondary surgeries and adjuvant therapy in patients with IFS. However, a longer operative duration was required. Use of IFS may be useful in patients with NMSC lesions in sensitive regions requiring complex reconstruction after tumour excision.

Research Article

MDM4 Isoform Expression in Melanoma Supports an Oncogenic Role for MDM4-A

The p53 tumor suppressor integrates upstream signals such as DNA damage and active oncogenes to initiate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. This response is critical to halting inappropriate growth signals. As such, p53 activity is lost in cancer. In melanoma, however, the p53 gene is intact in a reported 94% of human cases. Rather than direct mutation, p53 is held inactive through interaction with inhibitory proteins. Here, we examine the expression of the two primary inhibitors of p53, MDM2 and MDM4, in genomic databases and biopsy specimens. We find that MDM4 is frequently overexpressed. Moreover, changes in splicing of MDM4 occur frequently and early in melanomagenesis. These changes in splicing must be considered in the design of therapeutic inhibitors of the MDM2/4 proteins for melanoma.

Review Article

Diagnosis and Management of Lentigo Maligna: Clinical Presentation and Comprehensive Review

Lentigo maligna (LM), also known as Hutchinson’s melanotic freckle, is a form of in situ melanoma characterized by the proliferation of atypical melanocytes along the basal epidermis in sun-damaged skin. If left untreated, LM will progress to lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM), a form of invasive melanoma with the same prognosis as other forms of invasive melanoma. LM is more common in the elderly, with a peak occurrence between the ages of 65 and 80 years. LM, however, is rarely present on the trunk and extremities. The diagnosis of LM, confirmed by histopathological and biopsy examination, is based on clinical and dermoscopic features. It typically begins as a tan-brown macule or patch, but it can progress to a variegated pigmentation with dark black color or even amelanotic characteristics. The risk factors involved in the LM development include a history of sunburns, lighter skin types, advanced age, history of nonmelanoma skin cancers, and tendency to form solar lentigines. This article explains the clinical presentation of LM, also reviews the available information on the diagnosis and management of LM, and discusses the potential of such information in facilitating the future prospective.

Journal of Skin Cancer
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate29%
Submission to final decision34 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.520
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.