Journal of Spectroscopy
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate41%
Submission to final decision76 days
Acceptance to publication60 days
CiteScore2.600
Journal Citation Indicator0.490
Impact Factor1.914

Article of the Year 2020

Evaluation of the Capability of Horizontal ATR-FTMIR and UV-Visible Spectroscopy in the Discrimination of Virgin Olive Oils from the Moroccan Region of Beni Mellal-Khenifra

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 Journal profile

Journal of Spectroscopy publishes research into the theory and application of spectroscopy across all disciplines, including biology, chemistry, engineering, earth sciences, medicine, materials science, physics, and space science.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Dr Daniel Cozzolino is based at the University of Queensland, Australia. His research focuses on the developments of chemometric and spectroscopic methods for use in agriculture and food applications.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

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Research Article

Investigation of Formalin-Fixed Tissue Optical Characteristics in the Range of 200–500 GHz Using Pulsed Terahertz Reflection Spectroscopy to Differentiate Oral Malignant, Benign, and Cyst

The application of Terahertz electromagnetic waves to diagnose oral cancer was investigated. A single case of formalin-fixed oral squamous cell carcinoma (malignant), ameloblastoma (benign), and odontogenic keratocyst was examined using terahertz pulsed spectroscopy in the frequency span of 0.1–2 THz. The measured absorption coefficient, refractive index, and the extinction coefficient were reported to be high for malignant samples than benign and cyst. The THz results are validated with hematoxylin and eosin-stained microscopic images. The results demonstrate that the THz signal was shown to be consistently higher for the malignant sample compared to benign and the cyst. These results indicate that THz signals responded to the cell density by eliminating the effect of water.

Research Article

Quantitative Determination of Sucrose Adulterated in Red Ginseng by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) with Monte Carlo Uninformative Variable Elimination (MCUVE) and Support Vector Regression (SVR)

This paper introduces a method to detect the content of sucrose, an adulterant of red ginseng, based on terahertz spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out on red ginseng with 6 levels of adulterated concentrations using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). We separately extracted the information of the terahertz spectral curve by principal component analysis (PCA) and Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE) and then separately performed quantitative analysis by partial least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector regression (SVR). Because the nonlinear line factor in the terahertz spectral curve of red ginseng samples is considered, the MCUVE-SVR has high correlation coefficient (>0.99) and ratio prediction to deviation (>7.4), low root means square error of deviation (<1.2%), and Bias (<0.05%). The results prove that MCUVE-SVR can be regarded as an ideal quantitative analysis method in the detection of sucrose incorporation in red ginseng by terahertz spectroscopy.

Research Article

FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy Study of Soot Deposits Produced in the Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Vinyl Bromide

Even at low concentrations, poly-aromatic hydrocarbons found in soot have substantial health implications. Soot deposits have been reported and studied using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Using a CO2 photolysis laser, the samples were obtained via infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of vinyl bromide (VBr, C2H3Br) molecules. The solid deposit formed in the IRMPD of VBr when a relatively high fluence of the order of 204 J.cm−2 was analyzed by FTIR, and it was discovered that the majority of its composition is aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Significant fullerene-type carbonaceous soot particles are also found, which could correspond to C60 and C70 or other carbonaceous agglomerates of a higher order; however, the disappearance of this fullerene on Raman spectra cast doubt on this explanation. Our samples’ Raman spectroscopy has been compared to Tamor and Vassell’s research, which may indicate that they have a lesser degree of hardness and density than these authors’ results, indicating a larger hydrogen content in our samples. The optical gap has been calculated, yielding a very limited range of values ranging only between 1.0 and 1.2 eV, resulting in a crystalline size of 0.58 to 1.12 nm.

Research Article

A New Rule-Based Classification Method Using Shape-Based Properties of Spectral Curves

Due to its high spatial and spectral information content, hyperspectral imaging opens up new possibilities for a better understanding of data and scenes in a wide variety of applications. An essential part of this process of understanding is the classification part. However, the high spatial and spectral resolution also leads to enormous amounts of data. The effective handling and use of such datasets for classification requires processing steps (dimensionality reduction through feature selection or feature extraction) that are not always goal-oriented. In this article, a new general classification approach is presented that uses the geometric shape of spectral signatures instead of purely statistical methods. In contrast to classical classification approaches (e.g., SVM, KNN), not only are reflectance values taken into account, but also parameters such as curvature points, curvature values, and the curvature behavior of spectral signatures are used to develop shape-describing rules in order to use them for classification by a rule-based procedure with IF-THEN queries. The flexibility and efficiency of the methodology are demonstrated on datasets from two different application domains and lead to convincing results with good performance.

Research Article

Feasibility of Individual Carotenoid Quantification in Mixtures Using UV-Vis Spectrophotometry with Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS)

A fast and low-cost analytical method to determine the concentrations of carotenoids (β-carotene, lutein, and lycopene) from mixed standard solutions or from fruit extracts (kiwi fruits, tomato paste, pink grapefruit juice, kiwi-pineapple smoothie, and apricot nectar) was tested. The methodology was based on UV-Vis spectrophotometry and Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Results showed that relative concentrations of β-carotene, lutein, and lycopene in solvent were successfully determined by this technique with an error inferior to 6%. In real extracts, the procedure succeeded well in identifying the major carotenoid type of the fruit samples but also a more complex profile of a fruit mixture. The results also showed that accuracy of carotenoids determination by UV-Vis spectrophotometry-MCR-ALS in fruit extracts was conditioned by their spectral characteristics (III/II ratios and λmax), their relative proportion, and the extract purity.

Research Article

Comparison of Performance of Photodiodes with Different Active Areas Using Acrylic and Quartz Cuvettes for Spectrophotometry in Direct Measurements of Glucose in Water and Human Blood Plasma by Optical Means Using Near-Infrared

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most relevant noncommunicable diseases; the WHO figures in its latest update that 422 million people suffer from it; additionally, it has remained for more than 20 years within the 10 main causes of death worldwide; this disease affects the population at any age; glucose measurement is used to assist the treatment of this disease by different methods that are classified as invasive, minimally invasive, and noninvasive, the latter being an area of recent development due that it is not traumatic for patients. This work consists of the experimental characterization of an optical system for plasma glucometry using near infrared by spectrophotometry. This glucometry system is based on the employ of an infrared LED with a wavelength of 1650 nm, a beam angle of 16°, and an output power of 1.6 mW that passes through the analyte (glucose in blood plasma) that is contained in cuvettes of different materials (acrylic and quartz) to subsequently affect a photodiode with different active areas ranging from 0.06 mm to 1.5 mm in order to evaluate the efficiency by comparing the sensitivity in the presence of glucose making additions ranging 100 mg/dl–1000 mg/dl within a dark chamber. The experiments showed that the use of photodiodes with a larger active area and the use of quartz cuvettes show a higher sensitivity compared to photodiodes with small active areas and the use of acrylic cuvettes. This configuration presented an R2 of 0.99 and a sensitivity of 0.225 mV/1 mg/dl of glucose; despite the fact that the initial voltage in each of the experimental repetitions varies, the downward voltage pattern is maintained; based on this, it is concluded that this method using this setup is feasible for plasma glucose measurement.

Journal of Spectroscopy
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate41%
Submission to final decision76 days
Acceptance to publication60 days
CiteScore2.600
Journal Citation Indicator0.490
Impact Factor1.914
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.