Scientifica
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate25%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.380
Impact Factor-

A Remote Sensing Approach for Displaying the Changes in the Vegetation Cover at Az Zakhnuniyah Island at Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

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Research Article

Phenotypic Diversity Assessment of Okra (Abelmoschus Esculentus (L.) Moench) Genotypes in Ethiopia Using Multivariate Analysis

Okra is a minor crop that has not gained research attention in Ethiopia. Characterization of such underutilized crops has important implications for their utilization. Thus, this study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of okra genotypes in Ethiopia using agromorphological and biochemical markers. Thirty-six okra genotypes were evaluated for 29 agromorphological and biochemical traits. The results of the analysis of variance showed significant differences among genotypes for most of the traits, except for the number of flower epicalyx and fruit diameter. Results of the principal component analysis indicated that the first eight principal component axes accounted for 3.83 to 30.54% and 82.44% of the total variability. Genetic distances estimated by Euclidean distances from 27 traits ranged from 3.55 to 14.49. The 36 genotypes were grouped into four distinct clusters from the Euclidean distance matrix using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). The first cluster contained 24 (66.66%) genotypes, and the second cluster contained 10 (27.77%) of the genotypes. This study showed the presence of considerable genetic variation among the genotypes for most of the traits, including fruit yield, seed yield, and nutrient content of seeds, indicating the possibility of using these genotypes to develop okra varieties with high fruit-yielding and good nutritional content.

Research Article

A Prediction Model Optimization Critiques through Centroid Clustering by Reducing the Sample Size, Integrating Statistical and Machine Learning Techniques for Wheat Productivity

Machine learning algorithms are rapidly deploying and have made manifold breakthroughs in various fields. The optimization of algorithms got abundant attention of researchers being a core component for deploying the machine learning model (MLM) abled to learn the parameters in significant ways for the given data. Modeling crop productivity through innumerable agronomical constraints has become a crucial task for evolving sustainable agricultural policies. The cross-sectional datasets of 26430 (D1) crop-cut experiments are taken by 2nd-stage area frame sampling, collected from crop reporting service. This research is taken as follows: firstly three more effective numerical optimized datasets are generated (D1, D2, and D3) from D1 by taking the centroid points of features which decrease the sample size; secondly MLM is integrated with the traditional statistical models (TSMs) for multiple linear regression (MLR), and thirdly decision tree regression (DTR) and random forest regression (RFR) are deployed to get the optimized models able to predict the wheat productivity well with 75% datasets to train and 25% to test the model using the evaluation metrics (R2, RMSE), information criterion (AIC) with weights (AICW), evidence ration (E.R), and decompositions of prediction error. The MLR outperformed for MLM than TSM. The performance capability of MLM and TSM got upswing for generated datasets. RFR got optimized and superperformed for D1, D2, D3, and D4. This study demonstrated strong evidences for deploying MLM for prediction of wheat productivity as an alternative of traditional statistical modeling.

Research Article

Topical Administration Effect of Sargassum duplicatum and Garcinia mangostana Extracts Combination on Open Wound Healing Process in Diabetic Mice

This research aimed to determine the topical administration effect of the combination of Sargassum duplicatum and Garcinia mangostana extracts to ameliorate diabetic open wound healing. The study used 24 adult males of Mus musculus (BALB/c strain, 3–4 months, 30–40 g). They were divided into normal control groups (KN) and diabetic groups. The diabetic group was streptozotocin-induced and divided further into three treatment groups: the diabetic control group (KD), the S. duplicatum treatment group (PA), and the combination of S. duplicatum and G. mangostana treatment group (PAM). The dose of treatment was 50 mg/kg of body weight. Each group was divided into three treatment durations, which were 3 days, 7 days, and 14 days. The wound healing process was determined by wound width, the number of neutrophils, macrophages, fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and collagen density. Histological observation showed that the topical administration of combination extracts increased the re-epithelialization of the wounded area, fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and collagen synthesis. The topical administration of combination extracts also decreased the number of neutrophils and macrophages. This study concluded that the topical administration of the combination of S. duplicatum and G. mangostana extracts improved the open wound healing process in diabetic mice.

Review Article

Importance and Relevance of Phytochemicals Present in Galenia africana

Many people in developing countries rely primarily on medicinal plants as their main source of healthcare, particularly for the treatment of skin infections. Despite the widespread use of medicinal plants, there is a lack of literature describing the relevance and risks of exposure of the phytochemicals present. Galenia africana has been used traditionally in the form of pastes, decoctions, and lotions to treat wounds and other skin-related ailments. This is a report on the phytochemical composition of G. africana and a review on the pharmacological importance and relevance of these phytochemicals. The major groups of phytochemicals identified in G. africana extracts were aliphatics, aliphatic triterpenoids, fatty acids, flavonoids, and phenolic and tocopherol compounds. These have been found to exhibit medicinal properties, thus highlighting the need to assess the safety of G. africana for topical application. The information related to the safety of the various compounds could indicate the potential risks related to accidental intake of the extract upon topical product applications. This report concludes that the quantities of the phytochemicals present in G. africana should not cause undue risk to human health, which provides comfort to pursue future work on using and developing G. africana as a therapeutic agent.

Review Article

The Effects of Exercise on Aging-Induced Exaggerated Cytokine Responses: An Interdisciplinary Discussion

Aging is generally known to be associated with dynamic biological changes, physiological dysfunction, and environmental and psychological decline. Several studies have suggested that aging is associated with increased inflammatory cytokines, causing several diseases. However, the effect of exercise on aging has been less delineated, and the relationships between cytokine activation, aging, and exercise also need further study. Here, we discuss some ideas about the effect of exercise on aging-induced exaggerated cytokine responses and discuss the possible roles of the aging-induced exaggerated cytokine response following exercise. Evidence from these findings suggests that exercise is a beneficially applicable model to use in studies on the mechanisms underlying the age-associated gradated cytokine response, and these results may provide guidelines for health professionals with diverse backgrounds.

Research Article

Effect of Bronchoscopist-Directed Sedation and Other Factors on Patient Comfort during Diagnostic Flexible Bronchoscopy

Background. The factors affecting patient comfort during flexible bronchoscopy are not sufficiently addressed in resource-limited countries, and a need to devise strategies to improve patient experience is felt. The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of sedation and other factors on patient comfort during flexible bronchoscopy. Methods. A total of 374 patients, aged ≥18 years undergoing flexible bronchoscopy, were enrolled in this prospective, single-center, cross-sectional study. The baseline clinical data of sedation and nonsedation groups were recorded. Anxiety level was assessed using Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Postprocedure VAS score (primary outcome measure) assessed the discomfort related to flexible bronchoscopy. Patient-reported willingness for a repeat procedure and occurrence of adverse events were used as secondary outcome measures. Based on the median of VAS score, the study population was divided into low discomfort and high discomfort groups, and the factors affecting comfort levels in these two groups were noted. Results. Postprocedural VAS score (median (Q1, Q3)) for sedation and nonsedation groups was 20 (15, 30) and 25 (20, 40), respectively (<0.001). Willingness for a repeat procedure was significantly more in the sedation group (). In the low and high discomfort groups, the preprocedural anxiety level (median (Q1, Q3)) was 20 (10, 25) and 30 (20, 40), respectively (). Conclusion. Bronchoscopist-directed sedation significantly reduces patient discomfort and increases their willingness for a repeat procedure. Midazolam-fentanyl combination and lower prebronchoscopy anxiety are associated with lower discomfort levels during flexible bronchoscopy. This study is registered with the Clinical Trial Registry of India (CTRI/2018/11/016328).

Scientifica
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate25%
Submission to final decision58 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.380
Impact Factor-
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