Sleep Disorders
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Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision76 days
Acceptance to publication42 days
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Assessment of the Psychometric Properties of the Holland Sleep Disorders Questionnaire in the Iranian Population

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Sleep Disorders publishes original research articles and review articles related to all aspects of sleep disorders.

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Research Article

Daytime Sleepiness among Medical Colleges’ Students in Jordan: Impact on Academic Performance

Introduction. Sleep disorders are extremely prevalent in the general population. College students are more susceptible to sleep problems. This is due to the increased competition in getting a job position and the current alterations in the labor market. Poor sleep is prevalent and has deleterious effects on college students, but its frequency among college students has not been documented in Jordan. So, the aims of this study are to assess the prevalence of daytime sleepiness among medical college students in Jordan and to look for any links between daytime sleepiness and academic performance. Methods. A cross-sectional study performed on medical and paramedical specialties students and Epworth sleepiness Sscale (ESS) was used. To assess the students’ academic performance, the cumulative grade point average was utilized. Results. 977 students from five medical colleges participated in the study. ESS scores were abnormal in 34.4% of students and were considered to have daytime sleepiness. Significant lower ESS scores were associated with students who reported good sleep quality than students who reported poor sleep quality. Significant lower ESS scores were reported by students who slept more than 7 hours compared with students who slept less than 6 hours. The ESS scores were not significantly associated with students’ CPGA. Conclusion. Daytime sleepiness is highly prevalent among medical students in Jordan. The data of this study might be very helpful to assess the academic policy makers to develop intervention strategies that resolve the sleep disturbances in college students and reduce its impact on the academic achievements.

Research Article

Characteristics of Obese Patients with Acute Hypercapnia Respiratory Failure Admitted in the Department of Pneumology: An Observational Study of a North African Population

Background. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) is a common life-threatening event in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). Objectives. To study the clinical pattern, noninvasive ventilatory support, as well as the short- and long-term outcomes of patients with OHS admitted in a ward because of AHRF. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all adults with OHS , admitted in a 90-bed-ward for AHRF. Results. A total of 44 patients were included. Fifteen (34.1%) and 29 (65.9%) patients were diagnosed with malignant OHS (mOHS) and nonmalignant OHS (non-mOHS), respectively, while 36 (81.8%) had coexisting obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Patients with mOHS had a significantly higher rate of heart failure (100% vs. 31%; ), chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) (73.3% vs. 41.4%; ), and dyslipidemia (66.7% vs. 34.5%; ) than those with non-mOHS. The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in our patients was of of the predicted value, lower than what is usually reported in stable patients with OHS. At hospital admission, more than two-thirds (, 77.3%) were misdiagnosed as having asthma exacerbation (, 4.9.1%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation (, 27.3%) and/or heart failure (, 65.9%). Acute pulmonary oedema (ACPE) (, 36.4%) and acute viral bronchitis (, 27.3%) were the main identified causal factors, while no cause could be determined in 5 (11.4%) patients. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) using bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) was very highly effective to treat AHRF, with only 2.27% of patients failing the modality. Median overall duration of ventilation was 9 hours per day (1.3–20) and was significantly longer in patients with mOHS than in those with non-mOHS (10 [6–18] vs. 8 [1.3–20], respectively; ). Forty two of the forty-three patients discharged alive were treated with BIPAP or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in 26 and 16 patients, respectively. The probability of survival was 90% at 12 months, while the probability of readmission for a new episode of AHRF was 56% at 6 months and 22% at 12 months, respectively. Conclusion. AHRF in OHS patients is a life-threatening event which can be successfully and safely treated with BIPAP, with a low long-term mortality even in patients with mOHS.

Research Article

Sleep Quality and Emotional State of Medical Students in Dubai

Poor sleep quality has been reported to be common amongst medical students and healthcare professionals worldwide. Sleep disturbance has been associated with increased rates of burnout and depression. As a result, this has been negatively impacting performance and functioning. Research on this topic is limited in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This study is aimed at exploring sleep pattern and the emotional state of medical and dental students in Dubai, UAE. This cross-sectional study was based on an electronic survey sent to 181 medical and dental students. Of the 181 invitations, 96 individuals agreed to participate and complete the rating scales. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was utilized to explore sleep duration, quality, and daytime functioning. The Positive and Negative Affect Scale was used to assess the emotional states of the participants. Overall, the findings revealed diminished sleep duration. The average duration of sleep amongst the study participants was 5 hours and 24 minutes, which is significantly below the recommended duration as per sleep guidelines. Results also showed a significant positive correlation between total sleep duration and overall sleep quality with enthusiasm during the day. Future research designed to explore factors contributing to sleep efficiency, in more depth, as well as strategies to enhance sleep quality is highly warranted.

Research Article

Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Prevalence and Comorbidity with Other Non-communicable Diseases and HIV Infection, among Hospitalized Patients in Yaoundé, Cameroon

Background. Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), a growing public health threat, is an emerging condition in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Related SSA studies have so far used an incomplete definition. This study is aimed at assessing SAS using an American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) complete definition and at exploring its relationship with comorbidities, among patients hospitalized in a Cameroonian tertiary hospital. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in cardiology, endocrinology, and neurology departments of the Yaoundé Central Hospital. Patients aged 21 and above were consecutively invited, and some of them were randomly selected to undergo a full night record using a portable sleep monitoring device, to diagnose sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). SAS was defined as an /h, associated with either excessive daytime sleepiness or at least 3 compatible symptoms. Moderate to severe SAS (MS-SAS) stood for an . We used chi-square or Fisher tests to compare SAS and non-SAS groups. Findings. One hundred and eleven patients presented a valid sleep monitoring report. Their (range) was (28–87) years, and 53.2% were female. The prevalence (95% confident interval (CI)) of SAS was 55.0 (45.7, 64.2)% and the one of MS-SAS 34.2 (25.4, 43.1)%. The obstructive pattern (90.2% of SAS and 86.8% of MS-SAS) was predominant. The prevalence of SAS among specific comorbidities ranged from 52.2% to 75.0%. Compared to SAS free patients, more SAS patients presented with hypertension (75.4% vs. 48.0%, ), history of stroke (36.7% vs. 32.0%, ), cardiac failure (23.0% vs. 12.0%, ), and combined cardiovascular comorbidity (80.3% vs. 52.0%, ). Similar results were observed for MS-SAS. Metabolic and neuropsychiatric comorbidities did not differ between SAS and SAS-free patients. Conclusion. The SAS diagnosed using modified AASM definition showed high prevalence among patients hospitalized for acute medical conditions, as it was found with SDB. Unlike HIV infection, metabolic and brain conditions, cardiovascular comorbidities (hypertension and cardiac failure) were significantly more prevalent in SAS patients.

Review Article

Abnormal Sleep Duration as Predictor for Cardiovascular Diseases: A Systematic Review of Prospective Studies

Study Objective. This study is aimed at figuring out the role of abnormal sleep duration in predicting cardiovascular diseases. Methods. We searched the online database PubMed on 30 August 2020 for our data collection. We used the following keywords: sleep duration AND (cardiovascular disease OR cardiovascular event) AND (cohort OR prospective OR retrospective). We identified 653 studies, and after excluding studies that were published before 2015, we obtained 306 studies. After filtering the 306 studies through title and abstract screening and applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, we further reviewed fourteen studies with full-text reading. We excluded three studies because of insufficient data required and included eleven studies in this systematic review. Results. A total of 361,041 participants from ten studies were included in this systematic review. The incidence of hypertension, myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cardiovascular events, and cardiovascular diseases in the short sleep duration group is 46.12%, 0.59%, 5.43%, 0.09%, 7.18%, 1.48%, and 6.8%, consecutively, while the incidence of hypertension, myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, and heart failure in the long sleep duration group is 30.71%, 0.61%, 6.55%, 1.11%, and 6.04%, consecutively. Nine studies reported an association between sleep duration and cardiovascular diseases while one study reported no association. Seven studies reported that short sleep duration was significantly associated with CVD. Short sleep duration in this study was associated with hypertension and heart failure. Atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease were associated with both short and long sleep duration. Conclusion. Abnormal sleep duration (short and long sleep duration) may act as the predictor of cardiovascular diseases. The importance of having normal sleep duration should be stressed with other lifestyle modification to avoid the risk of getting cardiovascular diseases. However, further studies are needed to overcome the limitation of this systematic review.

Research Article

Occupational Difference in Association of Poor Sleep Quality and Metabolic Syndrome: Differences between Workers and Employees

Background. Regarding insufficient data about interaction of job in association of sleep quality with metabolic syndrome (MS), this study has been designed to evaluate this association in workers and employees. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 448 municipal staff (employee group: ; worker group: ) referring for periodic examinations. The relationship between sleep quality and MS and their relevant components was investigated in both groups. Results. In the worker group, poor sleep quality was independently associated with the risk of MS by 3.04 times (). Among the components of metabolic syndrome, hypertriglyceridemia was associated with a greater number of sleep disorder components. There was no association between metabolic syndrome and sleep quality in the employee group. Conclusion. Poor sleep quality exerts different effects on metabolic complications in employees and workers.

Sleep Disorders
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate32%
Submission to final decision76 days
Acceptance to publication42 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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