Translational Sports Medicine
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics

Metrics will be available once more articles are published.

Submit your research today!

Translational Sports Medicine is now an open access journal, and your articles will be immediately available to read and reuse upon publication.

Read our author guidelines

 Journal profile

Translational Sports Medicine promotes all aspects of sports medicine by exploring the translational pathway between mechanistic research and conceptually novel insight into human exercise activities in relation to diagnosis, treatment, performance or prevention of diseases or sports injuries.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Professor Michael Kjær, is the Head of the Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen. He researches the effect of exercise and physical activity on the body with a focus on sports injuries and what happens in the tissue when one gets injured.

 Abstracting and Indexing

This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

Latest Articles

More articles
Review Article

Resistance Training Interventions for Lower Limb Tendinopathies: A Scoping Review of Resistance Training Reporting Content, Quality, and Scientific Implementation

The objectives of this scoping review were as follows: (1) to describe what exercises and intervention variables are used in resistance training interventions for lower limb tendinopathy,  (2) to assess the completeness of reporting as assessed by the Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template (CERT) and the Toigo and Boutellier framework, and (3) to assess the implementation of scientific resistance training principles. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, Embase, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case series, case reports, and observational studies that reported using resistance exercises for lower limb tendinopathies were considered for inclusion, with 194 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Completeness of the reporting of exercise descriptors and programme variables was assessed by the CERT and the Toigo and Boutellier framework. Reporting of exercise descriptor items from the Toigo and Boutellier framework ranged from 0 to 13, with an average score of 9/13, with only 9 studies achieving a full 13/13. Reporting of items from the CERT ranged from 0 to 18, with an average score of 13/19. No study achieved a full 19/19; however, 8 achieved 18/19. Scoring for resistance training principles ranged from 1 to 10, with only 14 studies achieving 10/10. Eccentric heel-drops were the most common exercise (75 studies), followed by isotonic heel raises (38), and single-leg eccentric decline squats (27). The reporting of exercise descriptors and intervention content was high across studies, with most allowing exercise replication, particularly for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. However, reporting for some tendinopathies and content items such as adherence was poor, limiting optimal translation to clinical practice.

Research Article

Shoulder Lesions Do Not Increase Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Glenohumeral Instability: An Exploratory Study

Circulating protein biomarkers have demonstrated utility as a diagnostic tool in predicting musculoskeletal disease severity, but their utility in the evaluation of shoulder lesions associated with shoulder instability is unknown. Thus, the purpose of this exploratory study was to determine whether preoperative biomarkers of cartilage turnover and inflammation are associated with specific shoulder lesions in shoulder instability. Thirty-three patients (29.9 ± 9.4 years of age, 4.5 ± 4.7 dislocations) undergoing surgical treatment for shoulder instability were assessed for the presence or absence of associated shoulder lesions. Biomarkers including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1b) were collected at the time of surgery. Patients with Hill-Sachs lesions had a 31% increase in COMP plasma levels (). No other significant differences were observed for COMP, HS-CRP, IL-8, and MIP-1b with any shoulder lesion including Hill-Sachs lesions, capsular injuries, bony Bankart lesions, and SLAP lesions. In conclusion, inflammatory biomarkers including HS-CRP, IL-8, and MIP-1b were not associated with specific shoulder lesions, while biomarkers of cartilage turnover (COMP) were only elevated in Hill-Sachs lesions. These findings suggest that these biomarkers may have limited utility as prognostic indicators in patients with shoulder instability, though large-scale and longitudinal studies are still necessary.

Research Article

The Impact of the Instigator Rule on Fighting in the National Hockey League

Background. Fighting is often considered an essential part of professional hockey. Increased ticket sales, a means to self-regulate other dangerous gameplay, and helping teams win are a few of the reasons that fighting advocates provide for retaining fighting in the NHL. However, fighting trends have changed over the past 50 years. Given the recent data on concussions and player safety, an in-depth analysis of fighting is required to understand if fighting has a place in the future of the NHL. Methods. Seasonal statistical team data on NHL teams from the 1967 to 2019 seasons were collected and analyzed using publicly available databases. Specific outcome variables of interest related to fighting, penalties, the final team record for a given season, and final standing were recorded. The data were divided into subgroups according to “era of play” and before/after the implementation of the instigator rule. The trends in fighting, seasonal outcomes, and other minor penalties were assessed to determine the trends in fighting over the past 50 years, the relationship between fighting and winning, and the impact of the instigator rule. Results. Fights per game decreased significantly after the implementation of the instigator rule (0.71 to 0.51 fights per game,  < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in fights per game when comparing Stanley Cup champions to nonplayoff teams in either the modern era (0.36 vs. 0.42,  = 0.43) or the expansion era (0.45 vs. 0.51,  = 0.49). Only two Stanley Cup champions (the Flyers 1974–1975 and the Ducks 2006–2007) led the league in fighting. A multivariate regression analysis comparing fights per game and points earned per season divided by the number of games played revealed a statistically significant inverse relationship (coefficient = −0.16,  < 0.001). Conclusion. Our analysis demonstrates that the Instigator rule achieved its intended effect to decrease the number of fights per game. In the current era of professional hockey, there is no compelling evidence that a team with more fights per game will achieve greater seasonal success. These results continue to cast doubt on the belief that fighting is a necessary strategy for winning games at the NHL level.

Translational Sports Medicine
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics

Metrics will be available once more articles are published.

 Submit

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.